Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
  • Users Online: 106
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page


 
 Table of Contents  
CLINICAL IMAGE
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 21-22

Microfilariae in association with intra-abdominal malignancies: cytological findings of two cases


1 Department of Pathology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, India
2 Department of Gastroenterology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, India
3 Gut Clinic, Allahabad, Uttar Pradesh, India

Date of Web Publication28-Jul-2014

Correspondence Address:
Subhajit Das
Department of Pathology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2230-7095.137619

Rights and Permissions
  Abstract 

Filariasis is a major public health concern in tropical countries like India, presenting with lymphatic dysfunction. We report two cases of filariasis coexisting with intra-abdominal malignancies and present our cytological findings documented with high-resolution images.

Keywords: Cytology, filariasis, intra-abdominal malignancies


How to cite this article:
Dhameja N, Das S, Dixit VK, Gupta R. Microfilariae in association with intra-abdominal malignancies: cytological findings of two cases. Int J Stud Res 2014;4:21-2

How to cite this URL:
Dhameja N, Das S, Dixit VK, Gupta R. Microfilariae in association with intra-abdominal malignancies: cytological findings of two cases. Int J Stud Res [serial online] 2014 [cited 2019 Dec 14];4:21-2. Available from: http://www.ijsronline.net/text.asp?2014/4/1/21/137619

Filariasis is an endemic infection in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Wuchereria bancrofti is the most common causative filarial worm accounting for about 95% of the total filarial infections. Most patients present with lymphatic dysfunction in the form of lymphocele, hydrocele, chyluria, or groin lymphadenovarix, as the worm resides in the lymphatic channels or lymph nodes, causing lymphangiectasia [1]. We report two rare cases of microfilariae coexisting with intra-abdominal malignancies detected on cytology.

Case 1

A 55-year-old male presented with the loss of appetite, generalized weakness and abdominal pain for 2 months. On examination, the patient was cachectic with a firm, ill-defined lump palpable epigastric lump. Stool occult blood test was positive. Abdominal ultrasound revealed thickened gastric wall, and under sonographic guidance, fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) was performed from the thickened gastric wall to ascertain the etiology. Microscopic examination of the aspirate demonstrated large pleomorphic atypical cells with high nucleocytoplasmic ratio and nuclear hyperchromasia consistent with gastric carcinoma, and along with few microfilariae [Figure 1].
Figure 1 Gastric malignancy and microfilaria

Click here to view


Case 2

A 50-year-old female presented with abdominal pain and jaundice for last 1 month. Computed tomographic scan showed a mass in the gallbladder with infiltration into the liver. An ultrasound assisted FNAC from the liver mass revealed pleomorphic malignant cells. These malignant cells at various places formed gland-like structures and existed along with few microfilarial worms. The patient was diagnosed as metastatic adenocarcinoma of the liver [Figure 2].

Our case series demonstrate the association of microfilariae with intra-abdominal malignancy; gastric malignancy in the first case, whereas metastatic liver adenocarcinoma in the second. A literature review revealed only few cases of microfilariae in association with malignancies, of which most were tumors of the lymph node and lymphatics and malignant effusions of pleural and ascitic fluid [2]. Occasionally, they have been reported in association with primary malignant tumors of the thyroid [2], testis [2], pancreas [3], liver [4], and the urinary bladder [2]. With such rare association of microfilariae with malignancies, our case series serves best to promote awareness of such an association that might help physicians to choose appropriate chemotherapy for their patients. Moreover, our report also serves to add onto the existing pool of literature depicting association of microfilarial worms with intra-abdominal malignancies. The authors opined that rich blood supply of tumors could encourage the concentration of parasites at the tumoral site and subsequent rupture of these blood vessels may lead to hemorrhage and release of parasites into these areas. The observation of microfilarial worms in intra-abdominal malignancies in our case series could possibly be answered by the same explanation.
Figure 2 Metastatic adenocarcinoma of liver with microfilaria

Click here to view


 
  References Top

1.Szuba A, Rockson SG. Lymphedema: classification, diagnosis and therapy. Vasc Med 1998;3(2):145-56.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.Gupta S, Sodhani P, Jain S, Kumar N. Microfilariae in association with neoplastic lesion s: report of five cases. Cytopathology 2001;12(2):120-6.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.Mohan S, Andley M, Talwar N, Ravi B, Kumar A. An unusual association with carcinoma pancreas: a case report. Cytopathology 2005;16(4):215-6.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.Arakeri SU, Yelikar BR. Microfilariae in cytological smears of hepatocellular carcinoma. J Cytol 2007;24(3):158-9.  Back to cited text no. 4
    


    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2]



 

Top
 
 
  Search
 
Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
Access Statistics
Email Alert *
Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)

 
  In this article
Abstract
References
Article Figures

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1810    
    Printed148    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded180    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal


[TAG2]
[TAG3]
[TAG4]