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   2011| January-March  | Volume 1 | Issue 1  
    Online since July 6, 2013

 
 
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RESEARCH
Prevalence of stress, stressors and coping strategies among secondary school students in Kota Bharu, Kelantan, Malaysia
Muhamad Saiful Bahri Yusoff, Amirah Hayati Ahmad Hamid, Nadia Rabiyah Rosli, Nor Ayuni Zakaria, Nur Adila Che Rameli, Nurul Shazwani Abdul Rahman, Ahmad Fuad Abdul Rahim, Azriani Abdul Rahman
January-March 2011, 1(1):23-28
Introduction: In the process of growing, adolescents experience stress and their coping abilities determine the outcome. School training further adds to this stressful situation. It is noteworthy that persistently high stress levels will impair students' academic achievement, personal and professional development. This article describes the prevalence of stress, stressors and coping strategies among secondary school students in Kota Bharu, Kelantan, Malaysia. Methodology: A cross-sectional study was conducted on secondary school students in Kota Bharu, Kelantan, Malaysia. Secondary school and participant selections were done via stratified random sampling with a sample size of 505 students. The 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), Secondary School Stressors Questionnaire (3SQ) and Brief COPE inventory were self-administered to measure stress level, sources of stress and coping strategies respectively among the participants. Results: Out of 505 selected participants, 421 (83.36%) responded to this survey. This study found that the prevalence of distressed secondary school students was 32.8%. The major stressors for all types of schools were academic-related issues. This study showed that the students in technical school were more distressed than students elsewhere. Among the most frequent coping strategies used by the students were religion, positive reinterpretation, use of instrumental support, active coping and planning. There were relationships between intrapersonal and interpersonal related stressor, academic achievements, level of school and academic related stressor, attention from parent, behavioral disengagement, self-blame and planning coping strategies with stress level of the students. Conclusion: This study found that there was a high prevalence of distressed negatively stressed secondary school students, the major stressors were related to academic and contributing factors of stress were related to school training, students and parents. Training students on positive coping strategies, reducing stressor-related school training, and improving parent and teacher supports to the students will help to improve this condition.
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  4,058 430 7
FEAUTURE ARTICLE
Stop TB strategy- DOTS
Naeem Ahmad
January-March 2011, 1(1):16-18
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  3,433 359 2
RESEARCH
Morphological and morphometric analysis of mental foramen utilizing various assessment parameters in dry human mandibles
Abu Ubaida Siddiqui, Syed Rehan Daimi, Parmatama Prasad Mishra, Suraj Sudarshan Doshi, Jay Yashwant Date, Guruditta Khurana
January-March 2011, 1(1):19-22
Introduction: The mental foramen (MF) is a strategically important landmark during surgical interventions and anaesthetic blockage procedures involving the mental nerve. The purpose of this study was to assess various parameters pertaining to the morphology and morphometry of the mental foramen in 93 dry human mandibles. Methodology: Measurements were taken as the distance between alveolar margin and MF, distance between MF and base of the mandible, distance between symphysis menti and MF and distance between MF and posterior border of the ramus of the mandible. The study also included the relation of MF with the lower teeth (the position of the MF was recorded as lying in line with the long axis of a tooth or interdental space in one of the six types, 1 to 6). Results: The most common shape of the foramen was oval (70%). The most common position of the MF as related to the lower set of teeth was in line with the second premolar. The mean distance between symphysis menti and anterior margin of MF was 18.8mm (SD= 12.02) and 19.6mm (SD= 12.18), on the right and left sides respectively. Mean distance between posterior margin of MF and posterior border of ramus was 48.8 mm (SD=28.6) on the right side and 47.9 mm (SD=28.1) on the left side. Mean distance between alveolar crest and superior margin of MF was 10.2 mm (SD= 5.4) on right side and 10 mm (SD=5.2) on the left side. Mean distance between inferior margin of MF and lower border of the body of mandible was 9.9 mm (SD= 5.12) on the right side and 10.1 mm (SD= 5.2) on the left side. Conclusion: The study carries clinical credibility in ascertaining the accurate location of the MF and thus avoiding any unforeseen injury related to anaesthesia or dental surgeries.
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  3,400 348 1
CASE REPORT
Waardenburg syndrome type I- a rare case report
Gurmit Singh, Kunal Ahya, Dhananjay Y Shrikhande, Suhas Patil, Apurva Desai, Niranjan Bommisetti Kurukuti, Sankalp Yadav, Rajiv Girdhar
January-March 2011, 1(1):29-31
Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an inherited autosomal dominant disorder characterized by varying degrees of hearing loss and pigmentary anomalies affecting the eye, hair, skin. It is a rare syndrome affecting about 1 in 42,000 individuals. We herein report a case of WS type I in an 8 day old neonate, which to the best knowledge of the authors is the youngest reported case in literature.
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  3,288 328 -
EXPERT SPEAKS
International students in Australia: their challenges and implications for university counseling services
Pranee Liamputtong
January-March 2011, 1(1):8-11
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  2,940 435 2
My dream for medical students
Vasumathi Sriganesh
January-March 2011, 1(1):12-13
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  2,808 495 -
EDITORIALS
Cochrane Library- the medical information "Express Highway"!
Badrinarayan Mishra
January-March 2011, 1(1):5-7
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  2,867 311 -
Improving patient safety- a medical student's perspective
Zhen Chang Liang
January-March 2011, 1(1):1-3
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  2,850 312 1
EXPERT SPEAKS
Conducting research- a beginner's guidelines
Hematram Yadav
January-March 2011, 1(1):14-15
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  2,808 330 -
EDITORIALS
Student's research
Cees Th Smit Sibinga
January-March 2011, 1(1):4-4
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  2,739 306 1
LETTERS TO EDITOR
Serum Paraoxonase (Arylesterase) activity in chronic renal failure
Gayathri Balasubramaniam, Mohana C Priya, Usha Anand, Vijaya Duraiswamy, CV Anand
January-March 2011, 1(1):32-33
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  2,619 291 -
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